Trek to Har ki Dun

This trek takes you through remote village of Osla, pine and fir forest, Swargarohini peaks and Jaundar Glacier. You are at the lap of valley of Gods.

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Overview

Har Ki Dun valley, situated at the western flank of Garhwal in the Uttarkashi district is very popular to the trekkers both in Summer and Winter. It is a lovely walk to the Har Ki Dun valley with fascinating views of Jaundar Glacier and surrounding Swargarohini group of peaks. As a winter trek it offers a lot of snow on the trail coupled with ease of accessibility makes it’s a compelling proposition for those who want to experience a memorable winter vacation playing with tons of snow as River Tons flow as we start the trek.

 

Har-Ki-Doon (The hanging valley of gods) is a paradise for trekkers.The area, is known for its intricately carved houses, as the inhabitants here are an ingenuous lot, and the construction of the houses made with a combination of wooden beams and stones, not only looks aesthetic, but are also energy efficient as well as earth quake resistant. For those interested in religion or history, a visit to the beautifully carved temple dedicated to Duryodhana – the Kaurava Prince is a must visit! For those interested in glaciers – the Jaundhar Glacier at 4300 mt. is a mere five kilometers trek from Har-Ki- Doon.

As you would see, it is impossible to describe the beauty of this valley in words and we can write for ever, but one must visit this area to believe how nature has bestowed so much of beauty to this land and aptly called as  “Valley of the Gods!

Trek to Har-ki-Doon

Itinerary

Duration     : 6 nights 7 days from Dehradun to Dehradun
Difficulty Level   : Easy to Moderate

Best time to visit : April – June ; Oct to Jan

DAY 01 : Dehradun to Sankhri
Meet on arrival at Dehradun either at Airport / Railway Station in morning and start our journey from Dehradun and reach Sankhri (~ 1830 m, 6000 ft) via car/jeep/tempo traveler (depending upon size of group). Distance around 200 Km. The road is one of the scenic in Garhwal region while we go up to the classy hill station of Mussorie at the beginning, turquoise Yamuna  river in the middle and conifer forests and meandering Tons river at the later half of the journey. Overnight in tourist lodge at Sankhri.

DAY 02 :  Taluka to Seema.
We take a jeep to reach Taluka (~1980m, 6500 ft) which is 14 Km from Sankhri. We start our trek keeping the river Tons on our left and we proceed towards east for 10 Km to
reach the beautiful village of Seema (~2500m, 8200ft). Another village named Osla is nestled on the other bank of the river. People of these valleys worship Duryodhan of Mahabharata and one can see several temples dedicated to Mahasu who is the main deity. During Christmas Time it is expected to see these villages with silver shiny look for accumulated snow. Night stay in tent/rest house.

DAY 03:  Seema to Har ki Dun
Morning we start the beautiful walk  for Har Ki Dun valley (~3500m/11500 ft), another 10 Km and may take around 6 hr in snow condition. The trail goes through Kalkatti
Dhar and the view from here towards Ruinsara Valley and Kalanag peak is splendid. Overnight in tent/rest house.

DAY 04: Acclimatization and stay at Har ki Dun
Today we explore around the valley. Ready to encounter a lot of fresh snow while we do so. Either one can spend the whole day sipping tea or coffee and the viewing the glittering
Swargarohini group of peaks which is believed the way taken by the Pandavas to reach heaven or approach to Jaundar glacier for 3 Km and return to campsite.

DAY 05: Har ki Dun to Seema
After breakfast we gradually descend towards the village of Osla or further down to Seema. This is an easy walk but will be fun while on snow. Reach there by lunch and visit the temples and meet the local people and observe their culture. Night stay in tent/guest house.

DAY 06: Seema to Taluka and to Sankhri
First we get down to the road head of Taluka  for 10 Km.  We take a break here depending upon time we may have lunch here. From the motor head we take the jeep back to our
base Sankhri. Night stay at guest house.

DAY 07: Sankhri to Dehradun
Today  we start our return jeep journey for Dehradun. We reach there by late afternoon/early evening. The trip ends here. Depart for your respective destinations.

Price

* To be announced

Cost Includes:
Fully Catered Camping Trek which includes: Transportation from Dehradun to Sankhri and back, Breakfast/Lunch and Dinner during trek, Environmental fees, Guesthouse charges, Tents, Sleeping bags (best is to have your own), trekking equipments, mules/yak costs to carry luggage, guide and porter charges.

Cost Does Not Include:
Personal expenses, Insurance, Airfare and Camera Fees  tipping and porterage to carry personal backpacks.

Meals on the trek:

Breakfast:
Bread/Butter/Jam/Eggs/Tea.Corn, Veg Soup/Baked Beans/Tea/Coffee/Fruits or Porridge with fruits. Drinking Chocolate at bedtime. Tea / Coffee at early morning.

Meals:
Soup/Rice/Dal/Vegetables/Salad/Non-Veg/Dessert (Indian Meals)
Soup/Chowmein/Fried Rice /Tea Momo/Momos/Noodle Soup (Tibetan)

100%-Boiled water will be supplied before the trek every morning and refilled at lunch break. Please bring your own purifying agents for personal safety and satisfaction. Packaged drinking water (bottled water) is not allowed on Himalayas.

T&C

 TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Himalayan Fantasy always strives for cost effectiveness and better coordination by having a maximum team size of 9-10 participants. Thus initial fees collected assume a group size of 9-10 people. However, in case the group size is smaller than expected, Himalayan Fantasy representative would inform participants a month in advance of the departure date, the group size of the program. The participants would be requested to pay “the difference amount as applicable” reflecting the current size of group.

Booking must be confirmed 30 days prior to date of departure by paying the full amount – It takes lot of effort, time and money in planning the trek in remote locations. You would appreciate that this time is required for us to arrange for logistics in these remote regions.

All expenses accruing from change in schedule due to weather conditions or health issues are to be borne by the participants. Himalayan Fantasy would not be responsible for the weather changes or your personal health issues.

Cancellation policy – While we strive to plan everything for you well in advance, enabling your trip to be hassle-free and fun filled. Implication is that porter fees, permits, accommodation expenses need to be paid in advance. Any cancellation would be inconvenient and loss to all those who were involved in making your journey memorable. Considering the cascading effect you would appreciate that it is fair that the cost has to be borne by you. However, our policy on cancellation would be as under:

  1. Cancellation prior to 30 days from date of departure : Full Refund
  2. Cancellation between 30 days to 20 days prior to date of departure: 50% Refund
  3.  Cancellation between 20 days prior to date of departure and departure date: No Refund
  4. No Show : No Refund

FAQ

What is trekking?
A trek is a mountain walk from place to place, rather than just rambling or day walking from a fixed base. A trek is not necessarily more arduous or uncomfortable than centre-based sojourns; we believe they are more interesting and rewarding. Trekking appeals to different people for different reasons. Most are drawn to the healthy exercise and magnificent mountain scenery, both of which are fully guaranteed. Because of the type of treks we operate, Himalayan Fantasy particularly appeals to those who are seeking unspoiled areas and an opportunity to experience the indigenous culture, history and traditions of a region. For some- certainly not everyone the lure of trekking is the desire to take on a strenuous, testing high-altitude route. Trekking is a way of life in the mountains-one needs to walk to live.

How long is the trek and how far each day walking?
Generally the trek duration depends on your interest and location of trek. Your trek can last anywhere from 2-3 days to an entire month or longer if you wish. We can accommodate day hikes, cultural visits to local villages, and relaxing rest days on your trek. The decision is up to you. It is difficult to reply you when you ask how far each day walking but it is best answered in terms of time rather than distance, as mileage is dictated by altitude and terrain. Walking time, including rests, ranges from four to eight hours but there is no hard and fast rule.

How difficult are the treks?
The difficulty of our treks depends on where you want to trek and how long you want to go. The shorter Treks tend to be easier while the longer ones require some physical fitness. Be prepared for some steep trails leading to amazing views. The pace at which you hike is up to you. We have friendly and dependable porters to assist you with your personal gear.

Where do we stay on trek?
Where acceptable Trekkers Huts facilities exist, we normally use them. Tea houses are a way of life for almost all trekkers. They are the combination of guest house, restaurant, and social hang out. We encourage all trekkers along the Dzongri, Goechala, Jholomolari, Everest, Langtang, and Annapurna treks to try our routine treks and tea house treks. Our many years of experience along these routes have helped us find the friendliest, cleanest, and most enjoyable camps/huts and tea houses with the best views.. Many have hot water available for bathing. But we discourage our groups from using water heated by wood fires due to lack of firewood in most villages and Himalayas. Deforestation is a big environmental concern in OUR HIMALAYAS. These are also great way help support local villages. In remote terrain, we camp in tents. Even if you’ve never camped before, you don’t need to worry: the tents we provide are roomy, the sleeping pads/mattresses are comfortable. On all of our treks there is a bathroom tent and a dining tent with tables and camp stools, providing a cozy, comfortable atmosphere to eat and chat with fellow trekkers during the evening.

Where and what type of food is served?
If you are on a tea house trek you will eat breakfast and dinner at your tea house. We will stop for lunch at one of the various trail side for mid lunch prepared by our cooks. If you are on a camping trek we will prepare all meals and snacks. Almost every tea house serves the traditional meal, Dal Bhat (rice and curried lentils).. Some have versions of western food such as pizza and French fries too. The choice is yours.

How safe is the food?
Food safety is always a big concern when visiting a foreign country. This is why we do our best to choose tea houses and restaurants with clean and sanitary kitchens . On our lodge treks, we provide a cook to prepare safe and tasty meals with our own set of cookery as well as hygienic cleaning facilities. The food we serve on camping trips is completely safe. Our cooks have undergone high altitude diet preparations trainings to minimise the usage of excess fuel and combined cooking.

Where do we get water during the trip?
All tea houses have boiled water for trekkers. Your guide will provide you with all the water you need during your trek. We discourage the purchase of bottled water while on the trail. The plastic bottles are difficult to dispose off and have become an environmental problem. In a camping trek, we boil water in the morning and you will have enough boiled water in your bottle (Highly practiced in Sikkim).

Is the water safe to drink?
Your guide will be in charge of all your water needs. He will make sure all water is boiled and treated with iodine. Iodine is 100% effective in killing the bacteria in water. We recommend you get your own water cleaning tablets if you feel so about it.

What equipment should I bring?
Personal belongings for trek:

1. Backpack (55 – 65 L) with sturdy straps and supporting frame. Quechua Forclaz 60 is a good choice.
If required,  Daypack (20L) in optional.

2.Trekking shoes –A good trekking shoes with rubber sole or PVC sole required. Please don’t wear leather or sports shoes like Nike, Rebok, Adidas etc., These shoes will not support in snow.
Ladies with smaller feet size find it a problem to get a shoe. Quechua Forclaz 500 has special trekking shoes for women.

3.  Sleeping bags. They are required to be brought by you due to hygiene reasons.

Personal belongings for trek

1. Backpack (55 – 65 L) with sturdy straps and supporting frame. Quechua Forclaz 60 is a good choice.
If required,  Daypack (20L) in optional.

2.Trekking shoes –A good trekking shoes with rubber sole or PVC sole required. Please don’t wear leather or sports shoes like Nike, Rebok, Adidas etc., These shoes will not support in snow.
Ladies with smaller feet size find it a problem to get a shoe. Quechua Forclaz 500 has special trekking shoes for women.

3.  Sleeping bags. They are required to be brought by you due to hygiene reasons.

Trousers & Other dresses

a. 3 pair of track pants (at least one should be synthetic (quick-dry) kind). Or 3 pair of cotton pants with lots of pockets. Track pants are light and would be better.  Also bring thermals where you can wear the pants on top of thermals. No Jeans pants or any other type of pants.

b. 3-4 cotton tees with collar. No bright colours like reds and fluorescents. Stick with lighter tones. There are plenty of birds to be seen on the trek and you don’t want to scare them with your sense of dress.
Avoid loose fitting clothes. They restrict your movement. Plus you are going to lose weight while on the trek. Full sleeve light sweater. A light fleece jacket would be ideal.

A full sleeve feather jacket or something similar.

c. 2-3 pairs of cotton inners (optional)

d. 1 pair of thermal inners. Best to tolerate temperature when we pitch tents on snow.

e. 3-4 pair of usual sports socks, at least one woolen pair.

f. A pair of trekking pole is mandatory.

g. Wind cheater (to escape a quick burst of rain). Or a light rain coat.

h. Woolen hand gloves + synthetic glove (water proof) – if you have one.

i. Sun glasses – curved ones will cover your eyes well. No blue coloured sunglass — they don’t block UV. Blacks, greens, browns are fine. Avoid multi tone sunglasses. Sunglasses prevent snow blindness.Sunglasses are mandatory for this trek.

People who wear spectacles, choose one of these:
a. Use contact lenses.
b. Photochromatic glasses
c. If either of the above is not possible, wear your spectacles and carry a big sunglass that can be worn over your spectacles.

j. Woolen monkey cap/balaclava.
k.Light towel (should be thin, quick drying kind).
l.Chapstick or lip balm.
m.Cold cream & sun screen lotion (SPF 40+).
n. 2 Water bottles (1 L each). Do not get any packaged water bottle like Bisleri, Aquafina and others.
o. Torch with 2 extra set of cells. Buy LED torches. They last longer, are more durable and give good light.
p. Personal toilet kit (minimal) & toilet paper.
q. Personal medicine kit containing:

Crocin – 5 tablets
Avomine – 4 tablets
Avil 25mg – 4 tablets
Diamox – 8 tablets
Brufen 400 – 5 tablets
Combiflam – 5 tablets
Disprin – 10 tablets
Norflox – 10 tablets
Crepe bandage – 3 to 5 meters
Band aid – 10 strips
Digene – 10 tablets
Gauze cloth – 1 small role
Leukoplast – 1 small roll
Cotton – 1 small roll
ORS – 5 packets
Betadine cream
Moov spray

r. Some trekkers feel loss of energy more than others. While there is adequate food provided on the trek, carry lots of dry fruit combinations as snacks.
s. Small repair kit consisting of safety pins, thread and needle and a string is good idea to carry.
t.  Camera, spare films/memory-cards, batteries etc.
u. While packing, use plastic bags to compartmentalize things and carry few extra plastic bags.
v. Slippers/sports sandals (for walking around campsite).
x.  Sun cap and/or head-scarf.

MISCELLANEOUS BUT IMPORTANT TO NOTE;

A. Leave your denims behind – these are ill suited for treks and add weight.
B. Snacks, colas, alcohol and personal food – No need to overburden yourself with food.
C. Do not carry any disposable plastic bottles like (Bisleri, Aquafina), plastic wrapped/packaged items. Do not bring any non bio degradable material.
D. After packing, weigh your gear. It should be in the range of 8-9 kg – preferably on the lighter side. Anything heavier, you will need to iterate and remove what is not essential.
E. carry light and what is essential. As an example, toothpaste should be bought in small size (that can last you 10 days). Do not plan for “if” situations. The list of things mentioned here are exactly what you need and nothing more.
F. Dressing in layers is the mantra. So two T-shirts worn one over the other is warmer than a T shirt that is thick. This is just a guideline. Mileage vary based on your physical condition, threshold to cold etc.

Along with the above list, please ensure you also carry the following documents

1. An identification card (like driving license, voters ID card etc), along with a photocopy.
2. A passport size photo.

What happens if there is an emergency?
Himalayan Fantasy prides itself on being prepared for any emergency situation. Our guides are trained in first aid and can deal with most of the basic ailments that occur during a trek. But if a serious emergency occurs, then outside help is needed. Every client should have their own insurance before coming to Himalayas in-case an emergency occurs.

Is there a doctor on the trek?
We can’t guarantee a doctor on every trek, but we do try to encourage suitably experienced medical personnel to join our high altitude treks by offering a discount in return for looking after the medical needs of a group. In addition to trek doctors, our group leaders are trained in first aid.

Could you tell me how much money do I need?
This is bit of difficult to explain to you without knowing your proper holiday plan. But you can make always easy with explaining about your interest- that you like to do tour, trekking, rafting, wildlife safari, shopping etc. or with explaining about the categories of hotel that you’re going to accommodate and nature of tour you’re going to do, and total days for HIMALAYAS. We will tell you want cost for what! Then you will know the how much money should have to bring with you! Be sure while you’re in trekking or in tour- we have a safe in our office where plane tickets and money can be kept and other stuffs on our store.

What sort of experience do your guides have?
Himalayan Fantasy has some of the most dependable and experienced guides in Sikkim, Nepal, Bhutan and Darjeeling. All of our guides have spent years exploring the mountains and countryside of Our Himalayas. All guides speak English and have a deep knowledge of the various trekking routes. Our guides are trained in first aid and know how to react in any situation. And most importantly our guides are friendly and enjoyable and want to share with you the true beauty of Our Himalayas.

What would be when I am single or with my family?
On your interest, we do the both single guided trek/ tour and group tour. If you are alone and willing join with other people, this is always possible. On your request we will give all the details of the member and size of the groups that you’re joining. People traveling with us may be of any nationality, either sex, alone or accompanied, experienced travelers or complete beginners. Groups are always small (in general 10 or less). English is the common language, and there can be a wide age-range. We apply no upper age limit, though we ask those over 70 for their doctor’s confirmation of their fitness to participate. Generally speaking, we regard our trips as being for adults: unaccompanied minors are not accepted, but of course we will accept accompanied minors. Our family Trek is designed to accommodate younger children.

Will we have private rooms and bathrooms?
Private rooms are available in most tea houses except for those at very high altitudes in Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, Darjeeling, toilet tents will be used. Most bathrooms are shared. On our lodge treks we also provide someone to clean all bathroom facilities for our groups. Our lodge treks also include bed and pillow covers.

How difficult is the trek?
We can absolutely assure you that you do not have to be young, very experienced, or super fit to enjoy most of our treks. Our trekkers range from 17 to 70. Previous walking experience, though useful, is not essential: the great majority of our treks could be undertaken by anyone who is in good health, enjoys outdoor life, and is reasonably fit. Many of our guests casually participate in a sport such as swimming, cycling, tennis or golf.

What we do every day in trekking?
A trek day begins around 6 a.m. with a mug of coffee or tea served through your tent flap. Hot water is provided for washing and shaving, followed by breakfast. Water is provided for your water containers. We strike camp and begin walking in the pleasant cool of the morning for 3-4 hours before stopping for lunch. This two-hour break offers an opportunity to write in your diary, read and relax. The full meal typically includes fresh fruit, tinned meat, cheese, rice chapatis or biscuits, cooked vegetables, and tea or coffee. We usually reach our campsite by 4 p.m. and have tea and biscuits shortly afterwards. There is time to rest or explore before our evening meal at 6 p.m. This is the social event of the day. It begins with an appetizer and soup, followed by the main course and dessert with tea or coffee. The variety and quality of our “camp” food will delight you. Guests keep threatening to take our cooks home with them! As we mainly camp near villages, there is usually plenty of time to visit with the locals before or after dinner and sample their home brews. As night approaches, most people retire to their warm sleeping bags and are fast asleep by 9:30 p.m.

Environmental awareness?
Our approach is to raise environmental awareness in visitors to Our Himalayas. We also give information to our valuable customers on how to minimize the negative effects that their ignorance may have on Our Himalayas. We guide and help them how to trek gently and to support positive effects at culture and environmental conservation. We are also trying to protect the fragile environment and indigenous cultures of the Himalayas. We cook food by kerosene stoves, suggest you to stay in lodges that use kerosene or fuel efficient stoves/LPG’s and advise you to take hot showers when the water is heated with solar energy or hydroelectricity or black coal stove etc. We always take one extra porter to carry and manage all the garbage that our groups make in their campsite. Yearly we invest 20% of our net profit for above purpose and further more social work in the different approach of Our Himalayas. We always hearty welcome and enchant your comments and suggestions for a better way to serve our customers, environment and nature.

Why should I travel with Himalayan Fantasy and Treks?
There are many reasons. In a nutshell, we go out of our way to make sure your experience is a positive one, there will be no negative impact on the region we are visiting: after all, we live here. We give you more for your money than anyone else. And our safety record is unsurpassed. We also provide warm clothes, good walking shoes and other necessary trekking equipment for our Guide and Porters. They will get good accommodations along the way and food same as you are having on the way. All our trekking staffs are insured.

What is Altitude Sickness (AMS)?
Altitude sickness, often known as Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is a particularly important medical consideration while trekking in Nepal. Altitude sickness means the effect of altitude on those who ascend too rapidly to elevations above 3000 meters. The initial symptoms of AMS are as follows:
1. Nausea,
2. vomiting
3. Loss of appetite
4. Insomnia/sleeplessness
5. Persistent headache
6. Dizziness,
7. light headedness,
8. confusion Disorientation,
9. Drunken gait Weakness,
10. fatigue,
11. lassitude,
12. Heavy legs Slight swelling of hands and face
13. Breathlessness and Breathing irregularity

Reduced urine output
These symptoms are to be taken very seriously. In case of appearance of any of the above symptoms any further ascent should be reconsidered; otherwise more serious, even life-threatening problems can occur. The only cure for Altitude Sickness is to descend to lower elevations immediately. Acclimatization by ascending to no more than 300 to 500 meters per day above 3000 meters, and the proper amount of rest and re hydration are the best methods for prevention of AMS.
If you follow the simple advice of our trained guides, you won’t have to worry about complications from mountain sickness. We design our tours to ensure clients are ready for high altitude, and arrange alternative itineraries for those at risk.

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You could have a virtual experience before booking for this awesome trek by following the below link. Trek to Har Ki Dun in Pictures

Have questions on Har Ki Dun or any treks? Call us at +91 94821 36960 or email us at info@himalayan-fantasy.com

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